Another successful NYC hack fest. Boom. Photo courtesy Doug Kanter

Another successful NYC hack fest. Boom. Photo courtesy Doug Kanter

Cool idea!
diy:

Introducing DIY
We started building DIY a few months ago and now we’re sharing the first thing we’ve made. This is a company that we hope to spend decades crafting, but it’s important for us to build it out in the open, bit by bit, to encourage our community of kids and parents to share feedback with us continuously. From Zach’s experience making Vimeo, we understand that this sort of culture fosters collaboration and admiration between a company and its community, and ultimately leads to something that is loved.
Our ambition is for DIY to be first app and community in every kid’s life.  It’s  what we wish we had when we were young, and what we’ll give to our kids. Today we’re releasing a portfolio tool to let kids collect everything they make as they grow up.

We’ve all seen how kids can be like little MacGyvers. They’re able to take anything apart, recycle what you’ve thrown away – or if they’re Caine, build their own cardboard arcade. This is play, but it’s also creativity and it’s a valuable skill. Our idea is to encourage it by giving kids a place online to show it off, so family, friends and grandparents can see it and easily respond. Recognition makes a kid feel great, and motivates them to keep going. We want them to keep making, and by doing so learn new skills, use technology constructively, begin a lifelong adventure of curiosity, and hopefully spend time offline, too.
We’re looking to you parents as partners to make it all work. It used to be that you hang your kids’ work on the fridge to let them know you’re proud. Now the Web is becoming a part of their life at home and school — and there’s a new opportunity to connect you to their creations and cheer them on.
“Creativity now is as important in education as literacy, and we should treat it with the same status.” - Sir Ken Robinson
When you get your kid to join DIY early, you’re helping to recognize creativity as an essential part of every kid’s education, and possibly a requirement for their satisfaction as an adult. Sadly, most adults don’t believe they’re creative although we’re all capable of it at any age! We believe that to accept yourself as a creative adult you must start as a kid who is fearless of learning new skills and doing it yourself. Encouraging your kids to be inventive and self-reliant now will better prepare them to participate in a world that keeps changing.
Here’s how it works today:
DIY kids sign up and get their own Portfolio, a public web page to show off what they make.
They upload pictures of their projects using diy.org or our iOS app.
Kids’ projects are online for everyone to see, you can add Stickers to show support.
You also have your own dashboard to follow their activity and to make sure they’re not sharing anything that should be private.
Kids are ready for this. They’re instinctively scientists and explorers. They’re quick to build using anything at their disposal. They transform their amazement of the world into games. They’re often drawn to learning that’s indistinguishable from play (think about bug collecting!). And, most important, they embrace technology.
We’re grateful for your help to make this company, and grow the next — hopefully larger — generation of creative kids.
- Zach Klein, Isaiah Saxon, Andrew Sliwinski, Daren Rabinovitch(and Dave, Brian, Mike, Courtney, David, Lucas, Shawn, and Sean!)
PS. See our Parents page for more information. Or you can follow @DIY to see important updates.

Cool idea!

diy:

Introducing DIY

We started building DIY a few months ago and now we’re sharing the first thing we’ve made. This is a company that we hope to spend decades crafting, but it’s important for us to build it out in the open, bit by bit, to encourage our community of kids and parents to share feedback with us continuously. From Zach’s experience making Vimeo, we understand that this sort of culture fosters collaboration and admiration between a company and its community, and ultimately leads to something that is loved.

Our ambition is for DIY to be first app and community in every kid’s life.  It’s  what we wish we had when we were young, and what we’ll give to our kids. Today we’re releasing a portfolio tool to let kids collect everything they make as they grow up.

We’ve all seen how kids can be like little MacGyvers. They’re able to take anything apart, recycle what you’ve thrown away – or if they’re Caine, build their own cardboard arcade. This is play, but it’s also creativity and it’s a valuable skill. Our idea is to encourage it by giving kids a place online to show it off, so family, friends and grandparents can see it and easily respond. Recognition makes a kid feel great, and motivates them to keep going. We want them to keep making, and by doing so learn new skills, use technology constructively, begin a lifelong adventure of curiosity, and hopefully spend time offline, too.

We’re looking to you parents as partners to make it all work. It used to be that you hang your kids’ work on the fridge to let them know you’re proud. Now the Web is becoming a part of their life at home and school — and there’s a new opportunity to connect you to their creations and cheer them on.

When you get your kid to join DIY early, you’re helping to recognize creativity as an essential part of every kid’s education, and possibly a requirement for their satisfaction as an adult. Sadly, most adults don’t believe they’re creative although we’re all capable of it at any age! We believe that to accept yourself as a creative adult you must start as a kid who is fearless of learning new skills and doing it yourself. Encouraging your kids to be inventive and self-reliant now will better prepare them to participate in a world that keeps changing.

Here’s how it works today:

  1. DIY kids sign up and get their own Portfolio, a public web page to show off what they make.
  2. They upload pictures of their projects using diy.org or our iOS app.
  3. Kids’ projects are online for everyone to see, you can add Stickers to show support.
  4. You also have your own dashboard to follow their activity and to make sure they’re not sharing anything that should be private.

Kids are ready for this. They’re instinctively scientists and explorers. They’re quick to build using anything at their disposal. They transform their amazement of the world into games. They’re often drawn to learning that’s indistinguishable from play (think about bug collecting!). And, most important, they embrace technology.

We’re grateful for your help to make this company, and grow the next — hopefully larger — generation of creative kids.

- Zach Klein, Isaiah Saxon, Andrew Sliwinski, Daren Rabinovitch
(and Dave, Brian, Mike, Courtney, David, Lucas, Shawn, and Sean!)

PS. See our Parents page for more information. Or you can follow @DIY to see important updates.

There have been a lot of bits published about Instagram. Here’s the thing you really, really need to know in a nutshell about their success. Instagram was a combination. Specifically, it was a mashup of two already successful services: Hipstamatic and Foursquare. It took Hipstamatic’s great idea, made it free, even easier to use and added the nitro glycerine of a social feed (plus simple external social publishing). Kevin and Mike were also incredibly disciplined about not adding features, Eric Ries/MVP style. Sounds simple. It’s not. 

There have been a lot of bits published about Instagram. Here’s the thing you really, really need to know in a nutshell about their success. Instagram was a combination. Specifically, it was a mashup of two already successful services: Hipstamatic and Foursquare. It took Hipstamatic’s great idea, made it free, even easier to use and added the nitro glycerine of a social feed (plus simple external social publishing). Kevin and Mike were also incredibly disciplined about not adding features, Eric Ries/MVP style. Sounds simple. It’s not. 

I want to index social media and I'd like your like!

Hey so I’ve applied to this awesome opportunity with my friend Mor Naaman and we’d really appreciate your like or reblog if you think it’s cool! 

newschallenge:

1. What do you propose to do? [20 words]

Index all social media, allowing everyone to search, see, and better understand the world’s stories (e.g., Tahrir Square).

2. Is anyone doing something like this now and how is your project different? [30 words]

Yes: manual aggregation for events (eg.,…

(Source: newschallenge1)

"There may be no greater tribute to Steve’s success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented."

President Obama on the Passing of Steve Jobs: “He changed the way each of us sees the world.” (via moth)

(via moth)

Launching a new product is as much an art as it is a science—a risky endeavor with no guarantees. Successful products aren’t lists of ingredients—they’re thoughtful recipes. Success depends on the perfect mix of ingredients, time and craft. The market’s tastebuds are fickle and there’s only a few degrees difference between a success like the iPad and a failure like the TouchPad. This video is fascinating because it shows the focus Apple applies to its recipes and shows that its products aren’t lucky flukes, marketing hype or the result of Steve’s reality distortion field. They’re the result of laser-like focus on a product category and feature set. 

I recently had  the honor of product consulting with Gauri and the fantastic team at SpotOn. In one exercise, we reviewed the iPod product launch because it so beautifully demonstrates the questions product-focused CEOs ask themselves about their offerings. If I had to summarize the strategy from Jobs’ pitch it would go like this: 1) Find something meaningful to you; 2) Find something meaningful to others; 3) Survey the existing landscape; 4) Identify the valuable segment to focus on; 5) Create multiple improvements to that segment’s existing offerings.

Obviously these lessons apply to the more recent successes of the iPhone and iPad, but the parallels between the iPod and Apple’s previous innovations in personal computing and the GUI are striking to me too. Apple’s less an R&D house and more a synthesizer and popularizer of existing research. The company excels at translating innovative technology experiences to mass markets. Panasonic used to claim that they were “just slightly ahead of their time” but I think it’s a better slogan for Apple. Too far ahead of your time and you have expensive technology that won’t find a market (Apple learned this lesson with Lisa, Xerox with the Star). Too close to your time and you’re chasing the puck on falling prices for commodity hardware. The Lisa made a home appliance out of a decade of research from Xerox. But the Mac reduced Lisa’s price by 75% and changed the world. Likewise, with this video we see how Apple’s laser-like focus created a new product category and forever changed how music is listened to and distributed. 

Differences between ITP and the Media Lab

ITPMIT


I’m often asked what the difference is between ITP and Media Lab. Sometimes from prospective students, but mostly from high-powered executives or important writers who have heard of the program or The Show. I had one friend once who left Media Lab disappointed, so I’m super qualified to speak about it. 

MIT kids are smart. Really smart. They probably have been studying violin since they were, like, two. Then they wrote software algorithms when they were 10 to approximate a symphony that could play along with them in real time while they played Bach concertos. If these kids were a rock band, they’d be Emerson, Lake and Palmer with a laser show and a 360 major label deal

ITP kids are… resourceful. We didn’t invent hacking or email or lasers and shit. We invented QTVR, PComp, Gurl, Arduino and Foursquare. Instead of beautiful John Meada visualizations, we’ve got a lot of wooden tiles that move in concert to show you a picture of yourself and we think that’s art. It’s not really, but we never studied art so we don’t really know any better. If we were a rock band, we’d be the Ramones with their shitty recording contract and Laurie Anderson playing midi controlled tambourine.  

And that’s the difference between Media Lab and ITP. I created this Google spreadsheet MIT:MSG :: ITP:CBGB for further study. I hope this helps clear things up and finally puts the question of “What’s the Difference Between ITP and Media Lab?” to rest.

Join the Design Trust @ this weekend's Hackathon

Target by Jasper Johns by cliff1066™ on Flickr.



Sign up to Hack Design @ this weekend’s Hackathon!

SvpplyKickstarterVimeoTumblrForrstFoursquare. It’s a great time to be a designer in New York. We’re an art and design focused town and our take on the startup bubble is often being led by design centered founders and services. SVA’s IxD program and Techstars’ Design Hackstar program are also pointing to and creating new opportunities for creatives in the Big Apple. 


And this weekend there’s another chance to lubricate the evolving startup-design relationship at the TechCrunch Disrupt Hackathon. This is the third time I’m helping organize this carnival, but it’s the first time we’re specifically trying to partner awesome designers and hackers together. Pheobe Espiritu and Michael Yap will be leading the Design Trust - a group of experienced designers who will lend Design/UX support to the hacker teams. I can’t wait to see what comes out of this! If you’re a designer and want to play, Sign-ups are still open

Varsity Bookmarking: My Job Pt.1 — I have no idea what I'm doing

Honest as hell

pieratt:

I am the CEO of Svpply, Inc., a social shopping S-Corp operating out of New York City. My company has been the recipient of over half-a-million in investor dollars, for the stated purpose of building an unknown, 3,000-member web service into a cultural phenomenon, and I truly have very little…

(Source: pieratt)


“They teach safe sex in primary school but they don’t teach safe business in MFA programs. Why is that? The goal of this class is to stop creative professionals from having uninformed, unprotected business.” I’m teaching an Entrepreneurship for Designers Skillshare class this Sunday - please come! 

They teach safe sex in primary school but they don’t teach safe business in MFA programs. Why is that? The goal of this class is to stop creative professionals from having uninformed, unprotected business.” I’m teaching an Entrepreneurship for Designers Skillshare class this Sunday - please come